The Inner Life of Animals: Love, Grief, and Compassion — Surprising Observations of a Hidden World

Through vivid stories of devoted pigs, two-timing magpies, and scheming roosters, The Inner Life of Animals weaves the latest scientific research into how animals interact with the world with Peter Wohlleben’s personal experiences in forests and fields.Horses feel shame, deer grieve, and goats discipline their kids. Ravens call their friends by name, rats regret bad choices, and butterflies choose the very best places for their children to grow up.In this, his latest book, Peter Wohlleben follows the hugely successful The Hidden Life of Trees with insightful stories into the emotions, feelings, and intelligence of animals around us. Animals are different from us in ways that amaze us-and they are also much closer to us than we ever would have thought.

Dr. Allan N. Schore – Modern attachment theory; the enduring impact of early right-brain development

Dr. Schore is on the clinical faculty of the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, and at the UCLA Center for Culture, Brain, and Development. In this talk at our 2012 Research Symposium, he talks about the importance in a newborn’s life of a secure, primary attachment to a psychobiologically-attuned empathic caregiver. The empathic caregiver can soothe and calm as well as as enhance joy, interest and excitement. This shapes the child’s ability to communicate emotions. This plays an important role in infant brain development, and ultimately, the caregiver influences the critical wiring of infant brain circuits. The self-organization of an infant’s developing brain occurs in the context of a relationship with another self, another brain. There is now consensus, he says, “that current advances in our understanding of how social forces shape early brain development is ‘one of the most important discoveries in all of science that have major implications for our field.'”

“Secrets of the Soil Sociobiome” – Dr. Christine Jones

March 30th 2021
Dr. Christine Jones presents “Secrets of the Soil Sociobiome”

Links to articles mentioned in the Q&A are found below
1. Re-visioning soil foodwebs

Editorial by Mark Bradford, published in the Journal of Soil Biology & Biochemistry (2016). There are 14 other articles linked to this.

https://bradfordlab.files.wordpress.com/2016/03/bradford-m-a-2016-re-visioning-soil-food-webs-soil-biology-biochemistry-102-1-3.pdf

2. Techniques for assessing functional diversity in soils can be found in section 1.6 of the following article, entitled ‘Microbial Signaling in Plant—Microbe Interactions and Its Role on Sustainability of Agroecosystems’

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/313731425_Microbial_Signaling_in_Plant-Microbe_Interactions_and_Its_Role_on_Sustainability_of_Agroecosystems

3. Enhancement of drought tolerance in crops by plant growth promoting rhizobacteria

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0944501315300380?via%3Dihub

4. The following article is also illuminating ….

Rolfe, S.A, Griffiths, J, Ton, J. (2019). Crying out for help with root exudates: adaptive mechanisms by which stressed plants assemble health-promoting soil microbiomes. Curr Opin Microbiol. 49:73-82. doi: 10.1016/j.mib.2019.10.003.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1369527419300578?via%3Dihub

The Secret Language of Bacteria – An ASM “Microbes After Hours” Event

No bacterium lives alone — it is constantly encountering members of its own species as well as other kinds of bacteria and diverse organisms like viruses, fungi, plants and animals. To navigate a complex world, microbes use chemical signals to sense and communicate with one another.

Live streamed on Monday, January 28th, 2013, from 6-7:30 p.m. at ASM’s headquarters, 1752 N St., NW, Washington, D.C.

Dr. Bonnie Bassler, Princeton University

Bonnie Bassler Ph.D. is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and the Squibb Professor of Molecular Biology at Princeton University. The research in her laboratory focuses on the molecular mechanisms that bacteria use for intercellular communication. This process is called quorum sensing. Bassler’s research is paving the way to the development of novel therapies for combating bacteria by disrupting quorum-sensing-mediated communication. Dr. Bassler was awarded a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship in 2002. She was elected to the American Academy of Microbiology in 2002 and made a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2004. Dr. Bassler was the President of the American Society for Microbiology in 2010-2011; she is currently the Chair of the American Academy of Microbiology Board of Governors. She is also a member of the National Science Board and was nominated to that position by President Barak Obama. The Board oversees the NSF and prioritizes the nation’s research and educational priorities in science, math and engineering.

Dr. Steven Lindow, University of California, Berkeley

Steven Lindow Ph.D. is a Professor at the University of California, Berkley where his research focuses on various aspects of the interaction of bacteria with the surface and interior of plants. Dr. Lindow’ s lab uses a variety of molecular and microscopy-based methods to study the ecology of bacterial epiphytes that live on the surface of plants as well as certain bacteria that are vascular pathogens of plants. They also study bacteria that live in and on plants that are fostered by consumption of the alkaloids produced by endophytic fungi. The longer-term goal of their research is to improve plants’ productivity by achieving control of plant diseases through altering the microbial communities in and on plants. Dr. Lindow is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and was elected to fellowship in both the American Academy of Microbiology and the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1999.

The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate – Discoveries from a Secret World

In The Hidden Life of Trees, Peter Wohlleben shares his deep love of woods and forests and explains the amazing processes of life, death, and regeneration he has observed in the woodland and the amazing scientific processes behind the wonders of which we are blissfully unaware. Much like human families, tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, and support them as they grow, sharing nutrients with those who are sick or struggling and creating an ecosystem that mitigates the impact of extremes of heat and cold for the whole group. As a result of such interactions, trees in a family or community are protected and can live to be very old. In contrast, solitary trees, like street kids, have a tough time of it and in most cases die much earlier than those in a group.

Drawing on groundbreaking new discoveries, Wohlleben presents the science behind the secret and previously unknown life of trees and their communication abilities; he describes how these discoveries have informed his own practices in the forest around him. As he says, a happy forest is a healthy forest, and he believes that eco-friendly practices not only are economically sustainable but also benefit the health of our planet and the mental and physical health of all who live on Earth.

Accidental Courtesy

Daryl Davis is an accomplished musician who was played all over the world. He also has an unusual hobby, particularly for a middle aged black man. When not displaying his musical chops, Daryl likes to meet and befriend members of the Ku Klux Klan. When many of these people eventually leave the Klan with Daryl’s support, Daryl keeps their robes and hoods; building his collection piece by piece, story by story, person by person, in hopes of one day opening a museum of the Klan.

Understanding Why You Are Who You Are with Dr. Stephen Porges and Luke Iorio

Who are you and what makes you whole? Do you have triggers such as sounds or scents that remind you of a familiar feeling? Why do you look at the world the way you do? So many of your questions can be answered by scientist and Professor of Psychiatry, Dr. Stephen Porges, whose current work is unlocking the ways we can see another side of ourselves–our truest form.

Stephen is a distinguished University scientist at Indiana University where he’s the Founding Director of the Traumatic Stress Research Consortium. He’s a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina and Professor Emeritus at the University of Illinois at Chicago as well as the University of Maryland. Stephen has served as president of the Society for Psychophysiological Research and the Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences. He’s a former recipient of the National Institute of Mental Health Research Scientist Development Award.

Stephen has published more than 300 peer-reviewed articles and in 1994 he first proposed and pioneered the Polyvagal Theory, a theory that links the evolution of the mammalian autonomic nervous system to social behavior and emphasizes the importance of the physiological state in the expression of behavioral problems and psychiatric disorders.

Listen in and learn more about who you are–more now than ever!

Kay Takeaways:

Butterfly effect. Did you know we go through three evolutionary stages directly linked to those of vertebrates? To be clear, mammals are vertebrate and humans are mammals. The correlation between the two is eye-opening on how it affects your physiological state, let alone your health. Your THREE transformative stages are . . . [13:41].

Tranquility zone. Did you know that you have triggers that give you a sense of security? The sounds of certain music or someone’s voice are a couple of them. All your senses slowly drop, as do your defenses. There are simple ways to develop this sense of safety in ourselves and in others, start HERE . . . [25:34].

Connection boost. Did you know there’s no such thing as winning an argument? Once a person becomes physical–such as crossing their arms or retracting in some way–the conversation is over and therefore, the discussion is over. Winning isn’t an option. To strengthen any relationship–work, home, social–give these TWO evaluation methods a try . . . [39:44].

Tune in and turn the volume up for a dose of inspiration and life lessons. You’re never more than One Idea Away from a whole, new reality.

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Luke Iorio is President of The Institute for Professional Excellence in Coaching (iPEC) and has graduated thousands of coaches, leaders, athletes, and professionals across 44 countries, all of whom share his vision and desire for expanding our human potential and creating lasting, conscious change. He has been quoted in The Huffington Post, Fox Business, and Next Avenue, and is currently taking to the airwaves on the One Idea Away Podcast to entertain life’s pivotal questions with the help of celebrated thought leaders, mentors, and everyday unsung heroes.

Feedback without Criticism

I have yet to meet a person who likes criticism. Instead, what most of us do is contract inside when we hear a criticism. Sometimes we respond defensively, sometimes we add the criticism to our pile of self-judgment, and sometimes we deflect and ignore what’s being said. In the process, we rarely manage to make use of the vital information and opportunities that useful feedback can provide: learning, better teamwork, or simply insight and understanding.

Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus: The Classic Guide to Understanding the Opposite Sex

In his classic guide to understanding the opposite sex, Dr. John Gray, provides a practical and proven way for men and women to improve their communication and relationships by acknowledging the differences between them.

Once upon a time Martians and Venusians met, fell in love, and had happy relationships together because they respected and accepted their differences. Then they came to Earth and amnesia set in: they forgot they were from different planets.

Based on years of successful counseling of couples and individuals, Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus has helped millions of couples transform their relationships. Now viewed as a modern classic, this timeless book has helped men and women realize how different they can be in their communication styles, their emotional needs, and their modes of behavior, and offers the secrets of communicating without conflicts, allowing couples to give intimacy every chance to grow.

Thom Bond: “Teaching Compassion at Scale” | Talks at Google

Thom Bond, founder New York Center for Nonviolent Communication (NYCNVC), visited Google MTV to discuss the Compassion Course Online (compassioncourse.org). Since 2011, more than 12,000 people in 110 countries have learned to communicate compassionately through this year-long course. As a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), it grows in participation every year and is now offered in four languages, funded entirely through donations.

Moderated by Earl J. Wagner, Google’s local Compassionate Communication trainer and Google engineer.