IMPROVING VOCABULARY ACQUISITION WITH MULTISENSORY INSTRUCTION

The purpose of this action research project was to improve student vocabulary acquisition through a multisensory, direct instructional approach. The study involved three teachers and a target population of 73 students in second and seventh grade classrooms. The intervention was implemented from September through December of 2006 and analyzed in January of 2007. The goal was to gather evidence of a marked improvement in the number of vocabulary words that students recognize, understand, and use. Pre and posttests gathered data on student knowledge of fifty key content area vocabulary words. Three interventions based on brain research were implemented: specially designed graphic organizers, classical music, and Brain Gym® exercises. The gathered data indicates that students clearly understood and could define over five times as many words after this intervention (from 378 words to 1,941 words). The project results show that a multisensory, direct instructional approach improves student vocabulary acquisition. Educators need to increase their knowledge of brain research and implement direct instruction of vocabulary through the use of multisensory methods. (Contains 10 figures, 34 references, and 11 appendices)

The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done

The measure of the executive, Peter Drucker reminds us, is the ability to “get the right things done.” This usually involves doing what other people have overlooked as well as avoiding what is unproductive. Intelligence, imagination, and knowledge may all be wasted in an executive job without the acquired habits of mind that mold them into results.

Drucker identifies five practices essential to business effectiveness that can, and must, be learned:

  • Management of time
  • Choosing what to contribute to the practical organization
  • Knowing where and how to mobilize strength for best effect
  • Setting up the right priorities
  • And Knitting all of them together with effective decision making

Ranging widely through the annals of business and government, Peter Drucker demonstrates the distinctive skill of the executive and offers fresh insights into old and seemingly obvious business situations.

Illusions, delusions and the brain. A Ramachandran lecture on body image and mind body interactions.

This lecture by Prof. V.S. Ramachandran (University of California, San Diego) will focus on body image and mind body interactions.
https://www.glasgow.ac.uk%2Findex.html%3Frefer%3Dguyoutube&event=video_description&v=kcR8-Sq8dZk

This year’s prestigious University of Glasgow Gifford Lecture Series will feature three talks from V.S. Ramachandran, the Director of the Centre for Brain and Cognition and Distinguished Professor with the Psychology Department and Neurosciences Program at the University of California.

Founded in 1887 by the bequest of Lord Gifford, the annual Gifford Lecture Series was established to promote, advance and diffuse the study of Natural Theology in the widest sense of that term. The focus of this series will be ‘Body and Mind; Insights from Neuroscience.’

Ramachandran said: “Monday’s lecture will focus on body image and mind body interactions, while Wednesday’s lecture will deal with understanding higher brain functions through studies of synesthesia and other types of intersensory interactions, including discoveries of mirror neurons. I will also touch on the important deeper philosophical implications that surround these subject areas.”

Dr Susan Stuart, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Glasgow said: “It is our great pleasure that Vilayanur S. Ramachandran has agreed to present the 2012 Gifford lectures at the University of Glasgow. Ramachandran is one of the world’s leading neuroscientists; he has been responsible for groundbreaking work in the fields of behavioural neurology and psychophysics.

“His work on autism, visual processing, and synaesthesia is truly pioneering and during his career he has carried out marvellous work on understanding and treating phantom limb disorders as well as linking between temporal lobe epilepsy and hyper-religiosity, a field now known as ‘neurotheology’ or ‘spiritual neuroscience’.”

Biography:
V.S. Ramachandran is Director of the Center for Brain and Cognition and Distinguished Professor with the Psychology Department and Neurosciences Program at the University of California, San Diego, and Adjunct Professor of Biology at the Salk Institute. Ramachandran initially trained as a doctor and subsequently obtained a Ph.D. from Trinity College at the University of Cambridge. Ramachandran’s early work was on visual perception but he is best known for his experiments in behavioral neurology which, despite their apparent simplicity, have had a profound impact on the way we think about the brain. He has been called “The Marco Polo of neuroscience” by Richard Dawkins and “The modern Paul Broca” by Eric Kandel.
In 2005 he was awarded the Henry Dale Medal and elected to an honorary life membership by the Royal Instituion of Great Britain, where he also gave a Friday evening discourse (joining the ranks of Michael Faraday, Thomas Huxley, Humphry Davy, and dozens of Nobel Laureates). His other honours and awards include fellowships from All Souls College, Oxford, and from Stanford University (Hilgard Visiting Professor); the Presidential Lecture Award from the American Academy of Neurology, two honorary doctorates, the annual Ramon Y Cajal award from the International Neuropsychiatry Society, and the Ariens-Kappers medal from the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences. In 2003 he gave the annual BBC Reith lectures and was the first physician/psychologist to give the lectures since they were begun by Bertrand Russel in 1949. In 1995 he gave the Decade of the Brain lecture at the 25th annual (Silver Jubilee) meeting of the Society for Neuroscience. In 2010 he delivered the annual Jawaharlal Nehru memorial lecture in New Delhi, India. Most recently the President of India conferred on him the second highest civilian award and honorific title in India, the Padma Bhushan. And TIME magazine named him on their list of the 100 most influential people in the world.

Ramachandran has published over 180 papers in scientific journals (including five invited review articles in the Scientific American). He is author of the acclaimed book “Phantoms in the Brain” that has been translated into nine languages and formed the basis for a two part series on Channel Four TV (UK) and a 1 hour PBS special in USA. NEWSWEEK magazine has named him a member of “The Century Club” — one of the “hundred most prominent people to watch in the next century.” He has been profiled in the New Yorker Magazine and appeared on the Charlie Rose Show. His new book, “The Tell Tale Brain” was on the New York Times best-seller list.

In addition, Ramachandran has an interest in history and archaeology (see his article on the Indus Valley Code).

Collective Knowledge

Developing novel applications based on deep tech (ML, AI, HPC, quantum, IoT) and deploying them in production is a very painful, ad-hoc, time consuming and expensive process due to continuously evolving software, hardware, models, data sets and research techniques.

After struggling with these problems for many years, we started the Collective Knowledge project (CK) to decompose complex systems and research projects into reusable, portable, customizable and non-virtualized CK components with the unified automation actions, Python APIs, CLI and JSON meta descriptions.

Our idea is to gradually abstract all existing artifacts (software, hardware, models, data sets, results) and use the DevOps methodology to connect such components together into functional CK solutions. Such solutions can automatically adapt to evolving models, data sets and bare-metal platforms with the help of customizable program workflows, a list of all dependencies (models, data sets, frameworks), and a portable meta package manager.

CK is basically our intermediate language to connect researchers and practitioners to collaboratively design, benchmark, optimize and validate innovative computational systems. It then makes it possible to find the most efficient system configutations on a Pareto frontier (trading off speed, accuracy, energy, size and different costs) using an open repository of knowledge with live SOTA scoreboards and reproducible papers.

Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well

We get feedback every day of our lives, from friends and family, colleagues, customers, and bosses, teachers, doctors, and strangers.  We’re assessed, coached, and criticized about our performance, personalities, and appearance.

We know that feedback is essential for professional development and healthy relationships—but we dread it and often dismiss it.  That’s because receiving feedback sits at the junction of two conflicting human desires. We want to learn and grow, but we also want to be accepted and respected just as we are now.  Thanks for the Feedback is the first book to address this tension head on.  It explains why getting feedback is so crucial yet so challenging and offers a simple framework and powerful tools to help us take on life’s blizzard of offhand comments, annual evaluations, and unsolicited advice with curiosity and grace.

The business world spends billions of dollars and millions of hours each year teaching people how to give feedback more effectively.  Stone and Heen argue that we’ve got it backwards and show us why the smart money is on educating receivers – in the workplace as well as in personal relationships. It’s the receivers, after all, who interpret what they’re hearing and decide whether and how to change.

Coauthors of the international bestseller Difficult Conversations, Stone and Heen have discovered that while receiving feedback can be fraught, doing it well can be taught.  With humor and clarity, the book blends the latest insights from neuroscience and psychology with practical, hard-headed advice. It is destined to become a classic in the world of leadership, organizational behavior, and education.

Cultivating Communities of Practice: A Guide to Managing Knowledge

Today’s economy is fueled by knowledge. Every leader knows this to be true, yet few have systematic methods for converting organizational knowledge into economic value. This book argues that communities of practice–groups of individuals formed around common interests and expertise–provide the ideal vehicle for driving knowledge-management strategies and building lasting competitive advantage. Written by leading experts in the field, Cultivating Communities of Practice is the first book to outline models and methods for systematically developing these essential groups. Through compelling research and company examples, including DaimlerChrysler, McKinsey & Company, Shell, and the World Bank, authors Etienne Wenger, Richard McDermott, and William M. Snyder show how world-class organizations have leveraged communities of practice to drive strategy, generate new business opportunities, solve problems, transfer best practices, develop employees’ professional skills, and recruit and retain top talent. Underscoring the new central role communities of practice are playing in today’s knowledge economy, Cultivating Communities of Practice is the definitive guide to fostering, designing, and developing these powerful groups within and across organizations.

Michel Thomas – The Language Master

Michel Thomas spends 5 days with students who have previously failed to learn languages and, in the words of their teacher, they learn as much from Michel in those 5 days as they would normally learn in 5 years.

All without homework, writing or revision

How To Pomodoro Your Way To Productivity (Pomodoro Technique Tips)

Maximizing time is a constant struggle. Motivational speaker and entrepreneur Chris Winfield knows this all too well, as he struggled for years to make proper use of his time. After countless research, trial and error, and a little banging of his head against the wall, Chris has discovered that the key to him living his most productive life is 25 minutes long.

Desperate for a way to improve his productivity, Chris eventually discovered and settled on the Pomodoro technique. Invented by Frances Cirillo in the 1980’s, the Pomodoro technique maximizes time and efficiency by blocking out 25 minutes of uninterrupted focus. From there, Chris cut his work week in half, transformed his career and, most importantly, balanced his life.

Learning How to Learn: Powerful mental tools to help you master tough subjects

This course gives you easy access to the invaluable learning techniques used by experts in art, music, literature, math, science, sports, and many other disciplines. We’ll learn about the how the brain uses two very different learning modes and how it encapsulates (“chunks”) information. We’ll also cover illusions of learning, memory techniques, dealing with procrastination, and best practices shown by research to be most effective in helping you master tough subjects.

Using these approaches, no matter what your skill levels in topics you would like to master, you can change your thinking and change your life. If you’re already an expert, this peep under the mental hood will give you ideas for: turbocharging successful learning, including counter-intuitive test-taking tips and insights that will help you make the best use of your time on homework and problem sets. If you’re struggling, you’ll see a structured treasure trove of practical techniques that walk you through what you need to do to get on track. If you’ve ever wanted to become better at anything, this course will help serve as your guide.

This course can be taken independent of, concurrent with, or prior to, its companion course, Mindshift. (Learning How to Learn is more learning focused, and Mindshift is more career focused.)