Robin Wall Kimmerer, Reciprocity

Robin Wall Kimmerer on “Reciprocity” for the 28th Headwaters Conference topic “Science, Story and Justice.” Held by the Center for Environment and Sustainability at Western State Colorado University on October 6, 2017. Includes the slides from her presentation.

Robin Wall Kimmerer is a mother, scientist, decorated professor, and enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. She is the author of Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teaching of Plants and Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses. She lives in Syracuse, New York, where she is a SUNY Distinguished Teaching Professor of Environmental Biology, and the founder and director of the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment.

The 28th Headwaters:
This year’s topic is “Science, Story and Justice.” Kimmerer will speak as both a botanist and a native woman who learned plants through the stories of her ancestors and the inquisitive explorations of childhood. Topics will explore how language creates both justice and injustice as it unfolds in diverse ways of knowing—from scientific analysis to multicultural narratives.

The conference will feature tours of the Headwaters region, audience interaction and discussion, as well as exciting speakers like Robin Wall Kimmerer, Devon Peña, Mistinguette Smith (of the Black/Land Project), Aaron Abeyta, Michael Howard (of Chicago’s Eden Place Nature Center), and Gavin Van Horn (all of whom are featured in the new anthology Wildness: Relations of People and Place).

Treating the Farm as an Ecosystem with Gabe Brown Part 1, The 5 Tenets of Soil Health

Gabe Brown of Brown’s Ranch in Bismarck, ND, shares his transformative journey of cultivating his farm from modern conventional use to a thriving living ecosystem. Through no-till and extensive cover crop usage, Gabe and his family are able to support a diverse array of farm and ranching enterprises that are both profitable and models of sustainability in regenerative agriculture. Learn more at www.brownsranch.us

Autonomy: Differentiation, Agency, and Existence

“Would you like a little choice in your life?” ” Do you need to be able to decide for yourself?” “Do you love it when you get to follow your own emergence?” One of the needs that is most missing in our world, from childhood, through work, and on through old age, is the need for self-determination. What changes can we make so that this energy is more alive for us in our lives? What unconscious contracts can we release to make sure that we have a sense of freedom? And what is happening in the brain with the longing for choice, and what happens when that need is met? In this 90-minute session, we’ll learn a little about the brain, a little about unconscious contracts, and a lot about ourselves.

Prof. Robert Sapolsky – The Neuroscience Behind Behavior

Robert Sapolsky is an American neuroendocrinologist and author. He is currently a professor of biology, and professor of neurology and neurological sciences and, by courtesy, neurosurgery, at Stanford University.

Recorded: May 2017

“Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers: Stress and Health” by Dr. Robert Sapolsky

Science writer, biologist, neuroscientist, and stress expert Dr. Robert Sapolsky presents the inaugural Fenton-Rhodes Lecture on Proactve Wellness.

Sapolsky states that our bodies’ stress response evolved to help us get out of short-term physical emergencies – if a lion is chasing you, you run. But such reactions, he points out, compromise long-term physical health in favor of immediate self-preservation. Unfortunately, when confronted with purely psychological stressors, such as troubleshooting the fax machine, modern humans turn on the same stress response. “If you turn it on for too long,” notes Sapolsky, “you get sick.” Sapolsky regards this sobering news with characteristic good humor, finding hope in “our own capacity to prevent some of these problems… in the small steps with which we live our everyday lives.”

This lecture was recorded on September 22, 2016 at the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts’ Colwell Playhouse as part of the Pygmalion TechFest

Building the Software 2 0 Stack (Andrej Karpathy)

A lot of our code is in the process of being transitioned from Software 1.0 (code written by humans) to Software 2.0 (code written by an optimization, commonly in the form of neural network training). In the new paradigm, much of the attention of a developer shifts from designing an explicit algorithm to curating large, varied, and clean datasets, which indirectly influence the code. I will provide a number of examples of this ongoing transition, cover the advantages and challenges of the new stack, and outline multiple opportunities for new tooling.

Coping With Stress – Biofeedback: Self-Mastery Beyond Pills

Stress is ubiquitous and on the rise. How we learn to manage it can have profound effects on our health and well being. This series explains how our bodies experience stress and demonstrates effective strategies to help you thrive in a fast-paced world. On this edition, Richard Harvey discusses strategies to reduce stress beyond medication. Series: “UCSF Mini Medical School for the Public” [3/2008] [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 13720]

Google I/O 2014 – The design sprint: from Google Ventures to Google[x]

The design sprint is a process for prototyping and testing any product in 5 days. Using real-world examples, we’ll show how to move faster and increase the overall effectiveness (and happiness!) of your whole team. And we’ll offer techniques for teams of any size, from two-person startup to giant enterprise.

Tesla is going to ‘kill’ the auto industry with Elon Musk’s way of thinking about manufacturing, says SpaceX CTO

Tesla was for a long time a “product company” – meaning that it focused on creating great products first. It has been quite successful at it with vehicles, like the Model S, winning almost all car awards out there. But CEO Elon Musk has recently shifted the automaker’s focus to manufacturing – saying that the factory itself is probably more important than the product it is making.

The biology of our best and worst selves

How can humans be so compassionate and altruistic — and also so brutal and violent? To understand why we do what we do, neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky looks at extreme context, examining actions on timescales from seconds to millions of years before they occurred. In this fascinating talk, he shares his cutting edge research into the biology that drives our worst and best behaviors.